A Journey

What is Tai Chi & Qigong

Let's start with the first logical question. What is Tai Chi and Qigong? The ancient Chinese practices of tai chi and qi gong (pronounced CHEE-gung) combine slow, deliberate movements, meditation, and breathing exercises. ... The postures flow together without pause,...

read more

A True Reflection

From nowhere to somewhere, somewhere to nowhere from nothing to something, something to nothing standing too long injures the sinews Sitting too long injures the bones Looking too long injures the mind/spirit Maintain & train the mind & body as one constantly...

read more

What is Tai Chi & Qigong

dr-jeff-lan-tai-chi-form

Let’s start with the first logical question.

What is Tai Chi and Qigong?

The ancient Chinese practices of tai chi and qi gong (pronounced CHEE-gung) combine slow, deliberate movements, meditation, and breathing exercises. … The postures flow together without pause, making qi gong and tai chi look like slow, graceful dances that keep your body in constant motion.

Is Tai Chi a form of Qigong?

Tai Chi at a higher level is a form of Qigong, provided that the fundamental principles of Tai Chi are applied in the practice. While low-level Tai Chi is solely a physical exercise, at higher level it transcends into a Qigong discipline.

Which is better Qigong or Yoga?

Yoga tends to focus, at least in the West, on more physical postures or asanas. Qigong focuses on physical movements to a lesser extent and incorporates more of the breath and mind in its exercises. … Qigong movements are slower and more gentle than yoga movements.

Taiji (Chinese: 太極; Wade-Giles: T’ai Chi), short for T’ai chi ch’üan or Tàijí quán (太極拳), is an internal Chinese martial art practiced for both its defense training, its health benefits and meditation. The term taiji is a Chinese cosmological concept for the flux of yin and yang, and ‘quan‘ means fist. So, etymologically, Taijiquan is a fist system based on the dynamic relationship between polarities (Yin and Yang). Though originally conceived as a martial art, it is also typically practiced for a variety of other personal reasons: competitive wrestling in the format of pushing hands (tui shou), demonstration competitions and achieving greater longevity. As a result, a multitude of training forms exist, both traditional and modern, which correspond to those aims with differing emphasis. Some training forms of taijiquan are especially known for being practiced with relatively slow movements.

Qigong (pronounced “chee gong”) (simplified Chinese: 气功; traditional Chinese: 氣功; pinyin: qìgōng; Wade–Giles: ch‘i kung; literally: ‘life-energy cultivation’) is a centuries-old system of coordinated body-posture and movement, breathing, and meditation used for the purposes of health, spirituality, and martial-arts training.With roots in Chinese medicine, philosophy, and martial arts, qigong is traditionally viewed by the Chinese and throughout Asia as a practice to cultivate and balance qi (pronounced approximately as “chi”), translated as “life energy”.

Qigong practice typically involves moving meditation, coordinating slow-flowing movement, deep rhythmic breathing, and a calm meditative state of mind. People practice qigong throughout China and worldwide for recreation, exercise, relaxation, preventive medicine, self-healing, alternative medicine, meditation, self-cultivation, and training for martial arts.

Qi (or chi) is often translated as life energy, referring to energy circulating through the body; though a more general definition is universal energy, including heat, light, and electromagnetic energy; and definitions often involve breath, air, gas, or the relationship between matter, energy, and spirit. Qi is the central underlying principle in traditional Chinese medicine and martial arts. Gong (or kung) is often translated as cultivation or work, and definitions include practice, skill, mastery, merit, achievement, service, result, or accomplishment, and is often used to mean gongfu (kung fu) in the traditional sense of achievement through great effort. The two words are combined to describe systems to cultivate and balance life energy, especially for health and wellbeing.

A True Reflection

This content is only available to course members. Login to your account or enroll into the course to see content.

Address

20 Lower Burg Street

The Landing, 503

Cape Town South Africa

Follow Us

Pin It on Pinterest

Share This